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Review

In 2038, Detroit is no longer the "Motor City" with decaying glamour that it is here. Detroit is now considered Android City - it was here ten years earlier that Elijah Kamski, a young visionary and founder of the company CyberLife, invented the components necessary to make it possible to build human-like androids. This invention made Cyb...

Detroit: Become Human

  • Greg Burn
  • Jun 14, 2021

In 2038, Detroit is no longer the "Motor City" with decaying glamour that it is here. Detroit is now considered Android City - it was here ten years earlier that Elijah Kamski, a young visionary and founder of the company CyberLife, invented the components necessary to make it possible to build human-like androids. This invention made CyberLife the most valuable company in the world and androids began to be used in all aspects of life.

They now take over any unpleasant jobs but also act as teachers, medical professionals, relationship partners, personal assistants, salespeople, and much more. It sounds nice - more free time for people. But it also brings with it all the problems associated with digitization: people's work is being replaced by robots.

As a result, many people will lose their jobs and thus their status. On the one hand, the use of androids means a breathtaking improvement in people's quality of life and the increase of wealth for some, but for others, it means slipping into insignificance, addiction problems, and a life without prospects. We get further insight from TV shows and interactive magazines lying around everywhere.

The game is divided linearly into several story chapters that build on each other, and the very first chapter, in which we get to know one of the three main characters, the android Connor, is quite something.

After we have familiarized ourselves a bit with the controls - more on that below - we learn that Connor, model RK800, was designed for investigative work. Namely, we are at a crime scene here, and the perpetrator is a PL600, a household android named Daniel. He shot the father of the family and took the young daughter hostage. Connor is supposed to find out what happened and save the girl from the deviant, i.e. the "crazed android".

And so we look around the apartment for clues. Connor analyzes them and reconstructs what happened. This allows him to get closer to Daniel, who is on the roof terrace, completely dissolved and threatening the girl with a gun. Depending on the clues we have seen and investigated, we now get different conversation options - and depending on which approach we choose, the situation will have a different outcome.

And so our way of playing results in completely different solutions and, accordingly, numerous different outcomes for the game. 

In Detroit: Become Human, we experience this world and its ills alternately in the plastic skin of Connor, Kara, and Markus.

The developers design Detroit: Become Human with sympathy for the androids. 

Detroit: Become Human is a mixture of a game and an interactive movie. Episodes where we have a little time to look around and collect clues alternate with cinematic sequences where we watch our protagonists act. We can often control this somehow - either by making quick decisions, such as finding routes or by pressing predetermined button commands in time. If we don't manage to do that, the character gets beat up or what he does is simply not successful.

The game has one more drawback: it ends too quickly. But you have to remember that the first time you play through, you miss a large part of it. By taking a certain path, other paths fall away and you miss entire situations. If you shoot an NPC at the beginning of the game, you won't be able to encounter him later.

Detroit: Become Human is a winner all the way around, and anyone interested in artificial intelligence-related stories, or even linear story games, needs to play this game!

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